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wulfram
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26/01/2010 7:04 pm  

http://horrorgy.com/blog/2010/01/25/moonchild-by-aleister-crowley-announced-as-arcane-wisdoms-next-title /"> http://horrorgy.com/blog/2010/01/25/moonchild-by-aleister-crowley-announced-as-arcane-wisdoms-next-title/

MOONCHILD by Aleister Crowley

Moonchild is a novel written by the British occultist Aleister Crowley in 1917. Its plot involves a magical war between a group of white magicians, led by the protagonist Simon Iff, and a group of black magicians over an unborn child. It was first published by Mandrake Press in 1929.

Moonchild is a novel held in high regard for its magical and occult significance and also for its complex and well written prose.

Aleister Crowley 12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947), born Edward Alexander Crowley, was an English occultist, writer, mountaineer, poet, playwright, yogi, and possible spy. He was an influential member of occult organizations, including the Golden Dawn, the A∴A∴, and Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.) and is known today for his magical writings, especially The Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. He gained notoriety during his lifetime, and was denounced in the popular press of the day as “The wickedest man in the world.”

Crowley was also a chess player in his youth, a painter, astrologer, hedonist, bisexual, recreational drug experimenter, and social critic.

This edition will include a long introduction by Don Webb, a noted horror writer and author of Aleister Crowley: The Fire and The Force provides a long introduction to the work with some wit and perhaps some wisdom.


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Walterfive
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28/10/2010 5:33 pm  

Alarming number of typographical errors in Webb's afterword.


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wulfram
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28/10/2010 5:50 pm  

I noticed that as well. Hard to miss actually. A real shame... it's a lovely edition. I wish more care would have been given to it.


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christibrany
(@christibrany)
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28/10/2010 6:25 pm  

am I the only one who thinks the cover art and the design of the book doesn't fit the work/plot/theme of the book at all? in other words its a major fail like they put some cheesy halloween themed thing over a book thats not really dark at all.
This severe malfitting which is indicative of the sloppy work put into this production is the main reason i didnt buy this work, and chose the sphere paperback instead. the typos add to the 'fail' too unfortunately, based on your hearsay that is.


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alysa
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28/10/2010 6:47 pm  

I also think the design and cover art do not fit the work at all, but I was curious about the word by Donn Webb, I also was thinking like you that they made it unnessary Halloween-like, while that wasn't nessasary at all, I do not own the work for the moment.


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Walterfive
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28/10/2010 9:13 pm  

Well Christibrany and alysa, looking at the publisher, a horror/fantasy press, it's hardly suprising that the cover art (actually the interior color illustration, there is no dust jacket for cover art) is what it is, it's typical for the genre and product. Moonchild's not "dark" by *our* definition, but this IS a horror/fantasy press, and they're selling largely to their pre-established customer base; I'm sure they realized there would be some cross-over to the Temple of Set and to Crowley readers/collectors, but we're not their primary market or audience, ya dig? So it's a little more Goth than it might have otherwise been. It's a lovely edition. Quite nice on the bookshelf, the eye in the pyramid on the spine is quite eye-catching in gold.

Quite right, Wulfram: "hard to miss, actually." Quite hard to miss: among other things I used to proofread newspapers when I was a Journalist in the U.S. Army, so I still have a bit of an editor's eye for such things; Webb's afterword didn't seem like it had ever been copy-edited, and one suspects it was input by a typist for whom English was a second language. I was quite embarrassed for Mr. Webb, whose work until now I have had the highest regard for-- some of the typos are horrendous, and made his whole Afterword look very bad.

So, I guess I'll never buy another book from this publisher-- I didn't realize that standards in fiction publishing were slipping so badly, perhaps I'm spoiled from decades of purchasing books from publishers like Weiser, Starfire, Teitan, Mandrake, and Golden Hoard Press, to name but a few occult publishers I like and buy from regularly. But I'll keep it. 😉


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michaelclarke18
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28/10/2010 9:27 pm  

Perfectly hopeless.


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alysa
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28/10/2010 11:18 pm  

Well I might have expressed myself a little bit wrong, what I meant to say with 'unnessesary Halloween-like' was that the scary-effect came over a little bit overdue to me, of course I was also thinking it is a publisher of Fantasy/Horror, so I have of course no genuine problem with it, I also think the edition is worth the buy, certainly for that word by Donn Webb, and of course it can be beautiful in it's own way, certainly when you may get used to it, only those typografical errors might get my enjoyment in the way. . .


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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29/10/2010 12:27 am  

This book is signed by Webb, right? Is it not a limited edition?


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alysa
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29/10/2010 12:53 am  

Never heard of this edition being signed by Webb, but it's a limited edition.


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the_real_simon_iff
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29/10/2010 7:49 am  
"KaulaKali" wrote:
This book is signed by Webb, right? Is it not a limited edition?

See: http://www.lashtal.com/nuke/module-pnMediaLibrary-display-id-811.phtml

Unfortunately Walter and Wulfram are right: the number of typos is alarming. Also the text itself contains some, probably due to OCR problems.

Love=Law
Lutz


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Walterfive
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29/10/2010 3:39 pm  

OCR=Optical Character Recognition, a computerized text scanning process.

Yes, KaulaKali, it is a signed and numbered limited edition. Very pretty.


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alysa
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10/01/2011 5:30 pm  

I also have the book now, and must say it is a beautiful edition, I haven't got much opportunity to look in it, but of course it is not good that there are so many typos in it, but it's certainly worth to keep it.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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10/01/2011 8:37 pm  

Nothing to do with this particular edition, but regarding Moonchild itself, I've heard people citing this book for Crowley's thoughts and opinions on various matters discussed among the characters in this great little work of fiction, particularly those of Simon Iff. I wonder as to what extent you folks see this a legitimate sourcing of AC's actual thoughts and opinions on matters dealt with in the book? Or, should the contents of Moonchild be dismissed outright as fiction?


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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago
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10/01/2011 9:18 pm  

I think he does throw a lot of his own opinions in there. For instance, the O.T.O. instructions for incarnating some god/making a homunculus are very similar to those in the book. Though his opinion on the actual production of such things might have been a little different as evidinced by his letter calling Parsons basically an idiotic lout.


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 Anonymous
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10/01/2011 10:25 pm  
"N.O.X" wrote:
I think he does throw a lot of his own opinions in there. For instance, the O.T.O. instructions for incarnating some god/making a homunculus are very similar to those in the book. Though his opinion on the actual production of such things might have been a little different as evidinced by his letter calling Parsons basically an idiotic lout.

I particularly like the discussions of the nature of 'the soul.'


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