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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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23/07/2006 2:19 pm  

OK, I know that poetry falls under the heading of literature but in the 'Literature' thread, apart from the initial post mentioning Blake, all the other posts list novelists. I thought I'd start another topic as I'm quite enjoying the other one.

So, which poets do you read? I'll start the ball rolling with just a few of my favourites...

Aleister Crowley
William Butler Yeates
Robert Frost
Sylvia Plath

That'll do for a start... what have you got?

EDIT: You could just list favourite poems if you like, or post a couple if they aren't too long 🙂


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lashtal
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23/07/2006 2:29 pm  

H P Lovecraft
Kenneth Grant
James Joyce (just try reading Finnegans Wake as if it isn't poetry!)
Ernest Dowson
Gerald Massey
Swinburne

Now, this is more like it!

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
23/07/2006 2:33 pm  

Charles Baudelaire
Arthur Rimbaud
Paul Varlaine
William Blake
E.A. Poe
H.P. Lovecraft
Isidore Ducasse (Comte de Lautreamont).
Kenneth Grant
Aleister Crowley


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
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23/07/2006 2:36 pm  

Ok,

Aleister Crowley
Keats
Wilfred Owen and S. Sassoon
Edgar Poe - (sorry I had to and he does deserve a mention)
Blake - (again it has to be done)

After purchasing 'Convolvulus' I have to admit Im not really fussed on Ken Grants poetry but I will mention him for one poem which is 'The Poets Way' I really love that one.


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lashtal
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23/07/2006 2:38 pm  

Ah, yes, Rimbaud: What a fascinating life...

Owner and Editor
LAShTAL


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
23/07/2006 4:22 pm  

I'm adding a couple more...

Edwin Arlington Robinson - check out Mr Flood's Party

And Allen Ginsberg, though I only have his Reality Sandwiches and haven't read anything else by him.

Oh, and I think I'll add a poem by probably the most prolific poet of all time...

'I sometimes think I'd rather crow'
by Anonymous

I sometimes think I'd rather crow
And be a rooster than to roost
And be a crow. But I dunno.

A rooster he can roost also,
Which don't seem right when crows can't crow.
Which may help some. Still I dunno.

Crows should be glad of one thing though;
Nobody thinks of eating crow,
While roosters they are good enough
For anyone unless they're tough.

There're lots of tough old roosters though,
And anyway a crow can't crow,
So mebby roosters stand more show.
It looks that way. But I dunno.

I can't help reading that in a West Country accent but I found it in The Penguin Book of American Verse.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
23/07/2006 6:35 pm  

Well, I’ve just been rereading Barry MacSweeney (there’s an excellent large selection in print now, called Wolf Tongue) and Iain Sinclair’s Lud Heat, which I vastly prefer to his novels.

My essential texts: Pound’s Cantos; Olson’s Maximus Poems; Jack Spicer’s Holy Grail; JH Prynne’s White Stones; Bill Griffith’s Cycles; much of Yeats, David Jones and Sorley MacLean. Concrete poetry by Ian Hamilton Finlay and Tom Phillips’ Humument. Borderline prose: The Head of Vitus Bering by Konrad Bayer. Borderline drama: The Enemy of the Stars by Wyndham Lewis.

Other / older: any amount of ballads, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Blake, Chatterton, Holderlin, I’ve already mentioned Lautreamont’s Maldoror on the other list, Rimbaud, Emily Dickinson.


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kidneyhawk
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24/07/2006 12:26 am  

Poetry...there are a few Lovecraft tales which I read outloud to myself again and again as if they WERE poetry...in fact, they really ARE. My fave Lovecraft story ("poem") of all time is the fantastic Beyond The Wall Of Sleep.

Blake is a God. Walt Whitman can induce altered states of consciousness in his rhapsodies. Ralph Waldo Emerson's essays are also gloriously poetic and thelemic.

But the poetry of Robert Bly I find absolutely INCREDIBLE.

Have not read Kenneth Grant's poetry yet-are any snippets available anywhere on the web?

Kyle

PHYTON 444


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Anonymous
 Anonymous
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24/07/2006 1:15 am  

I'm not a huge poetry fan as its' dabblers tend to be quite dramatic, and though I have no problem with drama, I do have a hard time swallowing and not regurgitating without a little loathing coming up too, bad or only semi-decent poets' works. It all depends on the poet for me personally and how they represent the art doing live spoken word. A sense of presence and a know-how to read is a must. Without a good presentation, I'm not suckered in and with only reading, there has been nothing I've had set in front of me that I was enthralled with other than some classics, and then rarely even them.

Like a good Canadian girl I like Robert Frost. Not especially, but it's a name and maybe a new one to your minds ears. And of course though I never heard her, Sylvia Plath is automatically haunting just knowing how she died.

I also like many aspects Ani Difrancos' poetry. The majority of poetry I listen to is lyrical and found as music.

With Lovey Love Pie,

Vi


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kidneyhawk
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Posts: 1842
24/07/2006 2:02 am  

The Book The Iron Giant was written by Sylvia Plath's lover/husband Ted Andrews and is just a wonderful children's book-so great to read aloud the words for a bedtime story! I think Andrews philandering was a contributer to Plath's already serious depression-never the less, his book is phenomenal. How does this all relate to Thelema and keep from spilling into a Lit egroup? I don't know...the Iron Giant's ball out unstoppable show down to the death against the dragon from the stars filled me with a smiling feeling of how Will, once realized and directed, can be an unstoppable force.

It's very cool for us to find references to Thelema in "non-thelemic" sources (I recall an issue of the comic book the Silver Surfer where Galactus is speaking outside of time with the Universe and the artist eliminates panels on a two page splash-just Galactus and the Universe-I believe Galactus is the form of a blazing figure of Light-the Universe says: "There is honor in thine assumption of the star." Their hands clasp and Galactus replies: "Every man and every woman is a star.") But I also find the SPIRIT of WILL without particular Thelemic references to be equally moving...and when it comes to stories and esp. those I read to my kids, I think the wonder and imagination of a great tale can leave a huge impact on the heart...

Kyle

PHYTON 444


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
24/07/2006 10:32 am  

That's Ted Hughes Kidneyhawk.

And Felis , someone else recently mentioned JH Prynne to me, and after looking him up I've become sufficiently intrigued to order one of his book.Hasn't arrived yet though.
The poetry I revisit most often is probably by ee.cummings, Rainer Maria Rilke ,Dylan Thomas, and various surrealist/dada poetries.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
24/07/2006 11:33 am  

SHADOW SONGS

I

The glorious dead, walking
barefoot on the earth.
Treat them with all you
have: on the black marble
and let Nightingale come
down from the hills.
Only the procession is halted
as this spills down into
the current of the river:
their glorious death, if
such on earth were found.

II

And if the dead know this,
coming down into the dark, why should
they be stopped? We are too gentle
for the blind to see or be heard.
All the force of the spirit lies open
in the day, praise in the clock face
or age: the years, with their most
lovely harm. Leading the gentle
out into the wilds, you know they
are children, the blind ones, and
the dead know this, too.

Prynne at his most lyrical. BlueKephra, enjoy.


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kidneyhawk
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Posts: 1842
24/07/2006 2:12 pm  

Blue Kephra-ARG! You are SO right! Who the HELL is Ted Andrews (wait-is he that Llewellyn writer who does the books on animal magick? I think so! Dammit! I often-almost always-post on the GO without getting to reference my library and what not for a more (ahem) "scholarly" approach.

ANYWAY, I really DID love Mr. HUGHES use of language in that book-reading it to my son was a delight for BOTH of us and, dog gone it, now I want to read it again (right now we're going through the Little Prince).

The original illustrations in the Iron Giant are also SUPERB!

Thanks for the correction!

Kyle

PHYTON 444


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
25/11/2006 11:03 pm  

You could just list favourite poems if you like, or post a couple if they aren't too long

I offer a couple of my favorite short poems, written by ‘other poets’ than Crowley, to this thread.

---

Soul receives from soul that knowledge, therefore not by book
nor from tongue.
If knowledge of mysteries come after emptiness of mind, that is
illumination of heart.

-Rumi

---

I Am ME

In all the world, there is no one else exactly like me
Everything that comes out of me is authentically me
Because I alone chose it - I own everything about me
My body, my feelings, my mouth, my voice, all my actions,
Whether they be to others or to myself - I own my fantasies,
My dreams, my hopes, my fears - I own all my triumphs and
Successes, all my failures and mistakes Because I own all of
Me, I can become intimately acquainted with me - by so doing
I can love me and be friendly with me in all my parts - I know
There are aspects about myself that puzzle me, and other
Aspects that I do not know - but as long as I am
Friendly and loving to myself, I can courageously
And hopefully look for solutions to the puzzles
And for ways to find out more about me - However I
Look and sound, whatever I say and do, and whatever
I think and feel at a given moment in time is authentically
Me - If later some parts of how I looked, sounded, thought
And felt turn out to be unfitting, I can discard that which is
Unfitting, keep the rest, and invent something new for that
Which I discarded - I can see, hear, feel, think, say, and do
I have the tools to survive, to be close to others, to be
Productive to make sense and order out of the world of
People and things outside of me - I own me, and
therefore I can engineer me - I am me and
I AM OKAY

-Virginia Satir

---

The Magician

O Lord, deliver me from Hell’s great fear and gloom!
Loose thou my spirit from the larvæ of the tomb!
I seek them in their dread abodes without affright:
On them will I impose my will, the law of light.

I bid the night conceive the glittering hemisphere.
Arise, O Sun, arise! O Moon shine white and clear!
I seek them in their dread abodes without affright:
On them will I impose my will, the law of light.

Their faces and their shapes are terrible and strange.
These devils by my might to angels I will change.
These nameless horrors I address without affright
On them will I impose my will, the law of light.

These are the phantoms pale of mine astonied view,
Yet none but I their blasted beauty can renew;
For to the abyss of hell I plunge without affright:
On them will I impose my will, the law of light.

- translated from the french of Eliphas Levi

Khabs Am Pekht


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
25/11/2006 11:22 pm  

One of my favourites.....'Tannhäuser', by Aleister Crowley. Its beautiful!

http://www.hawkandjackal.com/Class_Room/Library/Documents/Crowley/TANNHAUSER.pdf


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panpsyche
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Posts: 14
26/11/2006 12:31 am  

Walt Whitman
Robert Graves


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Durga23
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Posts: 81
26/11/2006 4:18 am  

93 All-

This is an interesting thread - my offerings (not necessarily in this order):

Aleister Crowley
--Ethel Archer
--Victor Neuburg
Blake
Jeanne Robert Foster
Poe
Weldon Kees
Baudelaire
Rilke
Zachary Cox 🙂
Wallace Stevens

And as illustrated in his poem:

"Gods"

I fast and pray and go to church,
And put my penny in,
But God's not fooled by such slight tricks,
And I'm not saved from sin.

I cannot hide from Him the gods
That revel in my heart,
Nor can I find an easy word
To tell them to depart:

God's alabaster turrets gleam
Too high for me to win,
Unless He turns His face and lets
Me bring my own gods in.

-Countee Cullen (from "Color" 1925)

Best.

93 93/93
Durga23


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
26/11/2006 8:16 am  
"Caradoc" wrote:
So, which poets do you read?

Myself, mostly, but i have no choice - wish I did!

Other than that, my fav's are:
Zabolotski, Szymborska, Pilinszky, Ritsos, Yucel, Arends, Strand, Paz.

It's annoying that most thelemites have such a limited taste when it comes to poetry. Image what you'd feel like if a community responds to the question 'what's your favorite band' like this:

Mozart
Vivaldi
Tool
Britney Spears
Frank Zappa
Beethoven

That is exactly how I feel when I read these sort of threads 🙂
It's like a nightmare to me...

Martijn


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Bedazzled
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Member
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 38
26/11/2006 1:06 pm  

Poet
Antipoet
Cultured
Anticultured
A metaphysical animal burdened with dismay
An open spontaneous animal bleeding his predicaments
Lonely as a paradox
A fatal paradox
A flower of contradictions dancing a foxtrot
On the crypt of God
On good and evil
I am a screaming chest and a bleeding brain
I am an earthquake
The seismographs register my passage through the world

The wheels of the earth creak
And I go on riding my horse of death
I go on stuck to death like a bird to the sky
Like the date marked on a growing tree
Like the name on a letter
I go on stuck to my death
I go on through life stuck to my death
Leaning on the cane of my skeleton

The sun rises in my right eye and sets in my left
In my childhood as burning as alcohol
I would sit by the paths of night
Listening to the eloquence of stars
And the oratory of the trees
Now indifference snows in the evening of my soul
Break the stars into seeds
Shatter the moon into a thousand mirrors
Give the tree back to the nest of its acorn
I only want to know why
Why
Why

From Altazor by Huidobro


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
26/11/2006 1:20 pm  

ALMOST A CONJUROR

From a distance, he dims the lamp, moves chairs
without touching them. Tired, he takes off his hat and fans himself.
Then, with a gliding movement, he produces three playing cards
from the side of his ear. He dissolves a green, painkilling star
in a glass of water, and the spoon becomes transparent.
A goldfish can be seen swimming in his chest.
Then, exhausted, he lies down on the couch and closes his eyes.
"I have a bird in my head," he says. "I can't make it come out."
The shadows of two vast wings fill the room.

By Yannis Ritsos, translated by K. Friar.


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kidneyhawk
(@kidneyhawk)
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Posts: 1842
26/11/2006 3:37 pm  

Martijn-

Allright, this poem is wonderful-and I'm only getting it via translation ("Class B Poetry!"). It INSTANTLY evoked a full painting in my head and that painting was done in the weighty, visionary style of Max Beckmann. In fact, my body is pulling me to start MAKING the art as Beckmann is no longer with us and able to manifest the image!

I must tip my hat (or head-I never wear hats) to Beckmann as his very small but VERY visionary and mystical essay "On My Painting" still stands to this day as one of the most powerful and life-changing occult works I've ever read. My encountering of Beckmann overlaid onto my encountering the Tarot and they BOTH pulled me into a Tunnel in which I'm STILL rushing along, where Mystery and Revelation are continuously dancing.

Thank you for sharing the poem.

"Almost a conjuror?"

I think the conjuring is happening right NOW-! 😆

93

Kyle


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
26/11/2006 4:14 pm  

No one has mentioned Emily Dickinson yet, so here's one of her poems that might appeal to a Thelemic audience.

Much Madness

Much madness is divinest sense
To a discerning eye;
Much sense the starkest madness.
’T is the majority
In this, as all, prevails.
Assent, and you are sane;
Demur,—you ’re straightway dangerous,
And handled with a chain.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
26/11/2006 5:48 pm  
"kidneyhawk" wrote:
I must tip my hat (or head-I never wear hats) to Beckmann as his very small but VERY visionary and mystical essay "On My Painting" still stands to this day as one of the most powerful and life-changing occult works I've ever read.

Never read that, but Beckmann is indeed a wonderful artist. As I said before, all good art is magickal. That's why its so nonsensical to look for 'thelema' in art - the art itself is already magical and labels just tend to spoil it. We have a proverb in dutch that says 'Good wine doesn't need a label' - that just says about all...

Martijn


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kidneyhawk
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26/11/2006 6:13 pm  

The essay is short-if you can't find it on the web, just pm me and I'll get you a copy. He begins by lecturing to an audience, giving a rare presentation discussing his work as opposed to letting it discuss ITSELF. He then begins talking about the Magickal Process of painting and soon William Blake is manifesting from the Spirit World and he has quite opened a portal to another realm...not altogether unlike Burroughs Naked Lunch, which begins on the city streets, hardcore and grimey, and quickly transports the reader to Interzone where doors lead to doors and the visionary epic never lets up...in fact, it continues and flows right out of the book into other writings. Just like Beckmann's lecture...it has no ending or "in summary." It just opens up and flows out into his work.

I've always been attracted to idea of the Living Book-text, poetry, art etc which contains a quality of multi-dimensional activity-ingress and egress. Burroughs shot at this with Naked Lunch and regarded the book as HAPPENING where most books have "happened," written in the past tense and leaving no room for DEVELOPMENT in the text as an element evoked by the text itself. Liber AL functions very much this way, as a LIVING BOOK. Poetry (the topic of this thread) lends itself more naturally to this quality than narrative but radically new types of poetic-narrative have emerged within the last 50 years (93 Current, I'd say) which have generated new types of writing (and thus required new types of READING as an experience unto itself!). Robert Anton Wilson has done this. Grant Morrison in the field of comics. Kenneth Grant with the Trilogies (these books are more radical and evocative than may appear at first!).

PS-tfee, thanks for the Dickinson Post! I always feel a twinge of sadness when I think of her, clearly locked away from so much she longed for by her terminal shyness. She absolutely was in contact constantly with another dimesnion of vision though and pursued her will through pain with immense and prolific energy. I think of her everytime I hear the Waterboys' "The Whole Of The Moon."

93

Kyle


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
26/11/2006 6:19 pm  

"not altogether unlike Burroughs Naked Lunch, which begins on the city streets, hardcore and grimey, and quickly transports the reader to Interzone where doors lead to doors and the visionary epic never lets up..."

I just bought that movie, it's one of my all time favorites (like anything from Cronenberg) - bought 10 films this week including 5 films from Svankmeijer. I just saw 'Faust' yesterday for the first time, what a blast! One of the best movies I ever saw. Tonight will be Svankmeijer night and I will watch 2 more movies of him I didn't watch before...

Martijn


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Anonymous
 Anonymous
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26/11/2006 10:35 pm  

I thought this was a new topic and was surprised to find my post a few down. I then remembered the discussion from a month or two ago.

I don't know what the hell I was going on about, 'I don't like poetry because it's too much drama'... What a stupid thing to say.

I do enjoy drama, (even sometimes the crazy drama in life). It's a part of it, and it's necessary, can be entertaining and beautiful as in poetry. I write poetry but I think a large part of my reaction to the post was a wanting to write something, having nothing to say. I'm a bit of an undereducated drop-out with no post secondary education. Just a bit. I've just never studied poetry but I've read some Poe, and like I mentioned Robert Frost. Most Canadians have heard Frosts' work all through public school, and most of high school as well. I also read most of Confessions and took note of mentions and citations of all sorts of poets though I only really remember the name Swinburne, I think. I like to check out local poetry nights.

Outside of that, I can't think of too many. But Ritual is poetry to me and I adore it, so I had to say something. Re-reading my post was like... What the fuck was I on, glue?

But I wanted to emphasize this: That it's so nice to have a place like this to come to and educate myself. Thank you lashtal.com. 😆

Becky


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
03/12/2006 8:03 pm  

Requesting Whitman to be recited by a poet and muse,
following some lashtal.com recommendations this appeal did pursue.
A scarlet midnight w. capturing the seed of thought.
With her piercing sight did spy a lay
her being one who loving me was soulfully sought
she then LVX’d synchronistically in her sibylline way,
and her being one who wears nobly the mantles of poet and muse,
her recitation of this personally apt verse below then did ensue ---

When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer

When I heard the learn'd astronomer,
When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,
How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
Till rising and gliding out I wander'd off by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
Look'd up in perfect silence at the stars.

- Walt Whitman

Love Under Will

Owen

ps thank you all for the great recommendations on this thread and thank you to the moderators of lashtal.com for maintaining this superb forum.
Ave Lashtal.com!
😀

93


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
07/12/2006 3:51 pm  

T.S. Eliot thought the parallels of the Wasteland to The Golden Bough so self evident that he didn't even bother explaining them properly. Which is slightly annoying, but reading the two texts in parallel is extremely rewarding. There's PLENTY in there about Corn Gods, if that's your thing (which, judging by the number of Burroughs fans about, I would take to be a reasonable bet). I think this will probably unsettle their vessel, peel back and see:

Who is the third who walks always beside you?
When I count, there are only you and I together
But when I look ahead up the white road
There is always another one walking beside you
Gliding wrapt in a brown mantle, hooded
I do not know whether a man or a woman
—But who is that on the other side of you?

What is that sound high in the air
Murmur of maternal lamentation
Who are those hooded hordes swarming
Over endless plains, stumbling in cracked earth
Ringed by the flat horizon only
What is the city over the mountains
Cracks and reforms and bursts in the violet air
Falling towers
Jerusalem Athens Alexandria
Vienna London
Unreal

(From part 3, the Fire Sermon, I think...)

I'm also a big fan of Robinson Jeffers, one of the last great Wilderness poets America produced:

Inside a cave in a narrow canyon near Tassajara
The vault of rock is painted with hands,
A multitude of hands in the twilight, a cloud of men’s palms, no more,
No other picture. There’s no one to say
Whether the brown shy quiet people who are dead intended
Religion or magic, or made their tracings
In the idleness of art; but over the division of years these careful
Signs-manual are now like a sealed message
Saying: "Look: we also were human; we had hands, not paws. All hail
You people with cleverer hands, our supplanters
In the beautiful country: enjoy her a season, her beauty, and come down
And be supplanted; for you also are human."

(Hands)

And at the risk of boring you all, I like Shelley a very great deal. The diabolical forerunner of all the great Wicked Men of the modern era, he was actually a vegetarian posh boy, so little has really changed:

Drive my dead thoughts over the universe
Like withered leaves to quicken a new birth!
And, by the incantations of this verse,

Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth
Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind!
Be through my lips to unawakened earth

The trumpet of a prophecy! O, Wind,
If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?


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