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Perdurex
(@perdurex)
Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 35
23/12/2008 11:42 am  

Good day to all Lashtalers

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law

My recent post about possible misprints of Liber Arcanorum got some very sensible contributions by a few other users of this site, including one of its authors, and I again extend my thanks to them.

I would now be very interested to read other user's comments about the currently available printed versions of Liber Al.

I'm not thinking about the physical quality of the book or its printing, but the rendition of the text. Is it accurate when compared to the manuscrpt(s)?

For example, does the text/lines/numbers match up? What about the RPSTOVAL section with the 'G' that isn't really a 'G'? How about The crossed out parts and annotations? The pagination? Etc...

Your thoughts please.

Love is the law, love under will.

Perdurex x x x x x


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Michael Staley
(@michael-staley)
MANIO - it's all in the egg
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 4053
23/12/2008 2:22 pm  

The current printed versions of Liber AL have more to do with Crowley's interpretation of the manuscript than anything else. In the meantime, reproductions of the manuscript are available for us to make up our own minds.

Best wishes,

Michael.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
23/12/2008 3:48 pm  

I'd like to see a full size reproduction of Liber Legis in full color, ever since reading Red Flame #8, to see clearly all the details--but the manuscript reprint in Magick is pretty good. I wouldn't mind having the grid over III:47 disappear, it kind of obscures the original elegance.

As far as a typed, textual rendering of the manuscript, I think it is each to his own and open to debate. For instance, the stops (being the punctuation and perhaps the versing) are "as thou wilt".

I am not sure we should not correct spelling errors in the typeset either, for instance that "an" instead of "and" in II:72, etc.


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
23/12/2008 5:14 pm  

93

I am curious about certain discrepancies of capitalization which occur between the manuscript and the typeset version.

II:51 "Purple beyond purple: it is the light higher than eyesight."

Whereas in the manuscript 'Eyesight' is definitely capitalized.

This also occurs in I:13 "I am above you and in you. My ecstasy is in yours. My joy is to see your joy." Where "Ecstasy" is capitalized in the manuscript.

Interesting that both of these occurrences are with the letter E. Perhaps a graphologist would be able to say whether or not that is just the way Crowley wrote his Es when they began a word. I am not so qualified.

I'm not sure, but I believe there are a few other places where this occurs. Those I just remember off the top of my head.

Of course, the only real reason for the curiosity is that the Book instructs repeatedly not to change the style of the letters.
So what was the motivation to do so?

93/93


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slq
 slq
(@slq)
Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 15
24/12/2008 2:04 am  

93 Perdurex,

These are actually two distinct books: the holograph manuscript is Liber 31, and the typeset text is Liber 220. Both were transcribed by Aleister Crowley. The extent that they differ is not a matter of modern re-interpretation, but was actually prefigured in the manuscript itself, e.g. "the stops as thou wilt", "write this in whiter words", the insertion of the Stele verses from the vellum notebook, Rose's addition of "the five pointed star..." where the ms. notes "1 phrase lost", etc. Chapter I also has no verse numbers in Liber 31; these were inserted in Liber 220 by Crowley. As the receiver of the book and the Prophet of the Aeon, Crowley was both qualified and had the spiritual authority to issue Liber 220 based on Liber 31. In a sense, Crowley served as editor of Liber 220 for the author of Liber 31.

Most modern editions are faithful to Crowley's rendering of Liber 220 and also include Liber 31 per the instructions of III:47 - "but always with the original in the writing of the Beast". We did extensive proofing of Liber 220 for the OTO's Centennial Edition, even recalling an early version (before any were sold) to correct a missing indentation in the text.

93 93/93,
SLQ


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
10/09/2011 4:45 pm  

I hoped to see if there was a clue to the famous Liber Al puzzle on this forum (the other posts didn't convince me sorry).

The solutions (?) of this riddle on the internet are kabbalistic and numerological jugglings using the transcription, but suerly the handwriting has to be applied, because the position of the letters must be important.

I noticed some curious facts:

1. The number "24" appears twice and chapter 24 is just above.
2. You can read the words "moral" and and "love" quite clearly if you read the words of the two lines in a circle (the "g" looks as if it could be an e or c).
3. the "3 Y" just beside "love" looks like genitalia.

There must be more, but I can't find it. How about suggestions from YOU? 😉


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the_real_simon_iff
(@the_real_simon_iff)
Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 1836
10/09/2011 7:40 pm  

93!

Threads on this topic tend to get locked because quite a few people who think they "solved" the riddle, usually instantly assume direct successorship to (if not reincarnation of) Crowley. You will easily find enough threads which sometimes even are quite interesting and original. I just want to point out that your point 1 is unfortunately flawed, because chapter 24 is not above (it would be 25 anyhow), it is chapter 74. Anyway, your MORAL-LOVE and genitalia approach is certainly new to me - maybe not quite "curious facts" though.

Love=Law
Lutz


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
10/09/2011 9:30 pm  
"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
quite a few people who think they "solved" the riddle, usually instantly assume direct successorship to (if not reincarnation of) Crowley.

Me? A reincarnation of Crowley? 😀
<--- I'm just a Fool
Though I bet that Crowley was less likely to sing and dance and drop my pants which I tend to do after a lot of drinks. Or would have wanted to. 🙂

"the_real_simon_iff" wrote:
Anyway, your MORAL-LOVE and genitalia approach is certainly new to me - maybe not quite "curious facts" though.

Thank you Lutz!


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 Anonymous
Joined: 51 years ago
Posts: 0
12/09/2011 2:25 pm  
"slq" wrote:
We did extensive proofing of Liber 220 for the OTO's Centennial Edition, even recalling an early version (before any were sold) to correct a missing indentation in the text

Speaking of, any thoughts on why the opening word "Had!" is placed outside the text indentation? It looks like it was added after chapter 1 was written...


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