When Jimmy Page bought an imposing mansion on the banks of Loch Ness in 1970, he was drawn to the property because it once belonged to infamous occultist Aleister Crowley. The Led Zeppelin guitarist sold up after 22 years and few visits, reportedly concluding that there were “bad vibes” there. Today there are claims that occult groups are still haunting the “most notorious home in the Highlands”.Continue Reading

Pregnant with her first child, and beginning a slide into an abyss of heroin use, [Anita] Pallenberg, then 26, had a preoccupation with black magic that led her to increasingly fantastical realms. ‘I had an interest in witchcraft,’ she recalled later, ‘in Buddhism, in the black magicians that my friend, Kenneth Anger, introduced me to. The world of the occult fascinated me.’Continue Reading

Oxford undergraduates are more adventurous than Oxford dons. The Oxford Poetry Society, a typically worthy undergraduate club, decided to venture on a strange fields by listening to a lecture by Mr Aleister Crowley on Gilles de Rais, a fifteenth-century magician known to history as the companion-in-arms of Joan of Arc and to children as the celebrated Bluebeard. The dons, however, took alarm, and so Mr Crowley has had to stay behind in Kent, leaving, one imagines, his inquiring young disciples to the less exciting delights of a paper on Wordsworth, or, perhaps, even on the metrical basis of Alexander Pope’s verse.Continue Reading

The invaluable 100th Monkey Press website has just added some fascinating chess articles by and about Aleister Crowley.Continue Reading

Ancient Egypt magazine continues to be an essential monthly read for all those interested in the Egyptological basis of Thelema and to contextualise the life of Ankhefenkhons I. This month’s issue is especially interesting…Continue Reading

“A Warning to Australia: DEVIL WORSHIP HERE!” read the headlines, next to the image of a thin woman with unkempt hair, pencil-thin arched eyebrows and a focused scowl. Her name was Rosaleen Norton, “Roie” to those who knew her, a New Zealand-born artist and witch who made her home in Darlinghurst, near Sydney’s Kings Cross, in the 1940s and ’50s scandalising the conservative establishment.Continue Reading

A REMOTE ruin once owned by a notorious occultist dubbed “the wickedest man in the world” has been placed on a list of historic buildings under threat. Boleskine House, which sits on the south-east shore of Loch Ness, was reduced to a burnt-out shell when a fierce blaze ripped through the property in 2015. It was previously the home of infamous “black magician” Aleister Crowley, who scandalised British society in the early 20th century through his experiments with sex, drugs and the occult.Continue Reading

The inter-connection of occultism and espionage goes back at least to the Elizabethan intrigues of Dr. John Dee, and certainly is much older than that. For Crowley, Dr. Dee was a role-model in more ways than one. Occult orders and spy agencies do share much in common. Both are focused on the acquisition and safeguarding of specialised knowledge and embrace secrecy as a cardinal virtue.Continue Reading

To be honest, if there was any way of avoiding Aleister Crowley in this roughly chronological list – say, in favour of at least one female magician like Dion Fortune or Rosaleen Norton – then I would have gladly taken it, given both the enormous attention that Crowley has receivedContinue Reading