Tag: Publications

ADVANCED NOTICE: Aleister Crowley in Paris – Tobias Churton

‘Using previously unpublished letters and diaries, Churton explores how Crowley was initiated into the Golden Dawn’s Inner Order in Paris in 1900 and how, in 1902, he relocated to Montparnasse. Soon engaged to Anglo-Irish artist Eileen Gray, Crowley pontificates and parties with English, American, and French artists gathered around sculptor Auguste Rodin: all keen to exhibit at Paris’s famed Salon d’Automne. In 1904 — still dressed as “Prince Chioa Khan” and recently returned from his Book of the Law experience in Cairo — Crowley dines with novelist Arnold Bennett at Paillard’s. In 1908 Crowley is back in Paris to prove it’s possible to attain Samadhi (or “knowledge and conversation of the Holy Guardian Angel”) while living a modern life in a busy metropolis. In 1913 he organizes a demonstration for artistic and sexual freedom at Oscar Wilde’s tomb. Until war spoils all in 1914, Paris is Crowley’s playground.’

The Cult of Aleister Crowley: Being a True Story of Thelema, from its Beginning until the Present – Red Flame

In The Cult of Aleister Crowley, J Edward Cornelius adds over 150 pages to his Memoirs of an A.’.A.’. Initiate. Jerry details ‘the ongoing fight for Thelemic freedom against the Restrictionists in the A.’.A.’. lineage who have taken control of the O.T.O.’

Sword of Song to the Printers | Kamuret Press

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Kamuret’s edition of Aleister Crowley’s Sword of Song has been sent to the printers! Edited, annotated and introduced by Richard Kaczynski, this edition far surpasses that found in the Collected Works: red and black ink has been employed to capture the feel of the 1904 edition; a 50 page introduction by Crowley’s foremost biographer introduces the reader to the many themes to be found throughout the book; finally, copious end-notes further elucidate concepts and ideas in need of clarification.

Tobias Churton: Aleister Crowley in England

Drawing on previously unpublished diaries and letters, Tobias Churton provides the first detailed treatment of the final years of Crowley’s life, from 1932 to 1947. He opens with Crowley’s nick-of-time escape from the Nazi takeover in Germany and his return home to England, flat broke. Churton offers extensive confirmation of Crowley’s work as a secret operative for MI5 and explores how Crowley saw World War II as the turning point for the “New Aeon.”