Portal:Aleister Crowley/Selected articles/Selected articles 3

From Encyclopedia Thelemica
Revision as of 19:33, 21 July 2010 by Hecate (talk | contribs) (New page: '''Thoth''', pronounced "tote", is the Greek name given to the Egyptian god of the moon (lunar deity), wisdom, writing, magic, and measurement of time, among other things. As the cycl...)
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Thoth, pronounced "tote", is the Greek name given to the Egyptian god of the moon (lunar deity), wisdom, writing, magic, and measurement of time, among other things. As the cycles of the moon organized much of Egyptian society's civil and religious rituals and events, so Thoth was also seen as the primary regulator of such things. He was a son of either Ra or Set, but is also said to be the secretary and counsellor of Ra. Thoth was a close companion of Astennu, a name which was occasionally used to refer to Thoth himself. He had a daughter named Seshat.

Thoth was known as a reasonable mediator. He supported Horus vs. Seth and mediated between Tefnut and Ra. In Duat, the underworld, he helped Osiris judge the souls of the dead. He also convinced Hathor (alternatively: Tefnut) to return to Egypt after she fled, pursuant to an argument with Ra (alternatively: Shu).

He is sometimes identified with the Greek god Hermes or Hermes Trismegistus.

Thoth was credited by the ancient Egyptians as the inventor of writing and the 365-day calendar. He was usually depicted with the head of an ibis whose beak looks like a crescent moon) or of a baboon (a nocturnal animal that has many similarities to humanity).

During the late period of Egyptian history a cult of Thoth gained prominence, and millions of ibises were mummified and buried in his honour.

August 6 is a date traditionally sacred to Thoth. (more...)