Difference between revisions of "Portal:Encyclopedia Thelemica/TFA/Featured article 9"

From Encyclopedia Thelemica
Jump to navigationJump to search
(New page: 200 px|right|A depiction of the execution of Mansur Al-Hallaj '''Mansur Al-Hallaj''' (c. 858 - March 26, 922) was a Persian mystic, writer and teacher of...)
 
m
 
(3 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
[[Image:Hallaj.jpg|200 px|right|A depiction of the execution of Mansur Al-Hallaj]]
+
[[Image:Egypte louvre aigle.jpg|200 px|right|(Amulet representing a ram-headed falcon. Ancient Egypt, 254 BC (26th year of the reign of Ramses II), found in the tomb of an Apis bull in the Serapaeum of Memphis at Saqqara. Gold, lapis, turquoise and cornelian.Photo by Guillaume Blanchard, July 2004.)]]
'''Mansur Al-Hallaj''' (c. 858 - March 26, 922) was a Persian [[Mysticism|mystic]], writer and teacher of [[Sufism]].  His full name was ''Abu al-Mughith al-Husayn ibn Mansur al-Hallaj''.
+
'''[[Horus]]''' (Also Heru-sa-Aset, Hrw, Hr, and Hor-Hekenu) is the falcon-headed god of ancient Egyptian mythology.  
  
He was born around 858 in Tur, Iran to a wool seller.  Al-Hallaj's grandfather may have been a [[Zoroastrianism|Zoroastrian]]. His father lived a simple life, and this form of lifestyle greatly interested the young al-Hallaj. As a youngster he memorized the [[Qur'an]] and would often retreat from worldly pursuits to join other mystics in study.
+
Like many other gods the nature of what he was and the legends and stories that went with him changed over the course of History|history. Horus was an amalgamation of other, related deities, all of whom were sun gods and associated with the royal prerogative and the sky. Because Horus was a combination of other gods, it is rarely correct to refer to "Horus" as Horus was as much a family of related deities (though many had differing parentages) unified in one being; something similar occurs in many Christians' interpretation of the one God who manifests in three parts.  
  
Al-Hallaj would later marry and make a [[Pilgrimage|pilgrimage]] to [[Mecca]]. After his trip to the holy city, he traveled extensively and wrote and taught along the way. He travelled as far as [[India]] and Central [[Asia]] gaining many followers, many of which accompanied him on his second and third trips to Mecca.  After this period of travel, he settled down in the Abbasid capital of [[Baghdad]].
+
Heru-ur (also called Harmerti) is the oldest version of Horus, and was a falcon creator-god who was known for restraining Apep. His eyes were the sun and the moon; during a new moon, he was blind and was called Mekhenty-er-irty ("he who has no eyes") and upon the return of his sight, he was called Khenty-irty ("he who has eyes"). While blind, Horus was quite dangerous, sometimes attacking his friends after mistaking them for enemies. He was a son of [[Geb]] and [[Nu]]t and was the patron god of [[Letopolis]]. ([[Horus|'''more...''']])
 
 
Among other Sufis, Al-Hallaj was an anomaly, many sufi masters felt that it was inappropriate to share mysticism with the masses, yet Al-Hallaj openly did so in his writings and through his teachings. He would begin to make enemies, and the rulers saw him as a threat.  This was exacerbated by times when he would fall into trances which he attributed to being in the presence of [[Islamic Godforms|God]].  During one of these trances, he would utter ''Ana al-Haqq'', meaning "I am the Truth" and also, "In my turban is wrapped nothing but God?" which was taken to mean that he was claiming to be [[Islamic Godforms|God]], as Al-Haqq is one of the [[99 names of God|Ninety Nine Names of Allah]].   [[Al Hallaj|'''more...''']]
 
  
 
[[Category:Portals/Selected articles]]
 
[[Category:Portals/Selected articles]]

Latest revision as of 11:41, 27 November 2010

(Amulet representing a ram-headed falcon. Ancient Egypt, 254 BC (26th year of the reign of Ramses II), found in the tomb of an Apis bull in the Serapaeum of Memphis at Saqqara. Gold, lapis, turquoise and cornelian.Photo by Guillaume Blanchard, July 2004.)

Horus (Also Heru-sa-Aset, Hrw, Hr, and Hor-Hekenu) is the falcon-headed god of ancient Egyptian mythology.

Like many other gods the nature of what he was and the legends and stories that went with him changed over the course of History|history. Horus was an amalgamation of other, related deities, all of whom were sun gods and associated with the royal prerogative and the sky. Because Horus was a combination of other gods, it is rarely correct to refer to "Horus" as Horus was as much a family of related deities (though many had differing parentages) unified in one being; something similar occurs in many Christians' interpretation of the one God who manifests in three parts.

Heru-ur (also called Harmerti) is the oldest version of Horus, and was a falcon creator-god who was known for restraining Apep. His eyes were the sun and the moon; during a new moon, he was blind and was called Mekhenty-er-irty ("he who has no eyes") and upon the return of his sight, he was called Khenty-irty ("he who has eyes"). While blind, Horus was quite dangerous, sometimes attacking his friends after mistaking them for enemies. He was a son of Geb and Nut and was the patron god of Letopolis. (more...)