Portal:Encyclopedia Thelemica/FP/Archive

From Encyclopedia Thelemica
Jump to navigationJump to search

This is a list of Featured pictures that appear on the main page of the portal, numbered according to their position in the selection queue. For information regarding the rotation of content on the portal, please see: Portal:Encyclopedia Thelemica/Instructions

NO PICTURE SUMMARY
1
Kangchenjunga Map by Jacot-Guillarmod, 1914

"There was no time to spare, if we were to attack Kanchenjunga this summer. It was arranged that the doctor was to get together the necessary provisions and equipment at once in Europe, while I went direct to Darjeeling to make arrangements with the government about transport and such communications as the heliograph, by which means we intended to signal our progress to observers on Signal Hill, above the station, to collect some of our old Kashmir shikaris if possible, to learn a little Nepali, and perhaps to enlist the assistance of enterprising individuals on the spot.

I left for London on May 6th and made such preparations with regard to my personal equipment as seemed desirable, and on May 12th left England for the East by the P & O S.S. Marmora. Eckenstein maintained constantly that the adventure was foolhardy; that, for his own part, he would never consent to go on a mountain again with Jacot Duillarmod; and that, in one way or another, his vanity, inexperience, fatuity and folly were certain to land us in disaster. I liked Tartarin so well, personally, that I unconsciously minimized his imbecility; and I was still much too young to realize how much mischief may be done indirectly be the mere presence of such a man, despite every precaution that prudence can suggest and all the supervision that caution can recommend. So I went into it --- and realize only of late how lucky I was to come out of it all!"

("The Confessions of Aleister Crowley", Chapter 51)

2
Isis (c. 1380-1335 v. Chr.)

Isis (Ancient Greek: Ἶσις) was a goddess in Ancient Egyptian religious beliefs, whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. She was worshiped as the ideal mother and wife as well as the matron of nature and magic. She was the friend of slaves, sinners, artisans, the downtrodden, as well as listening to the prayers of the wealthy, maidens, aristocrats and rulers. Isis is the Goddess of motherhood, magic and fertility.

The goddess Isis (the mother of Horus) was the first daughter of Geb, god of the Earth, and Nut, the goddess of the Overarching Sky, and was born on the fourth intercalary day. At some time Isis and Hathor had the same headdress. In later myths about Isis, she had a brother, Osiris, who became her husband, and she then was said to have conceived Horus. Isis was instrumental in the resurrection of Osiris when he was murdered by Set. Her magical skills restored his body to life after she gathered the body parts that had been strewn about the earth by Set. This myth became very important in later Egyptian religious beliefs.

3
Austin Osman Spare


Austin Osman Spare (December 30, 1886 - May 15, 1956 EV) was an English artist and magician. He was the son of a London policeman. As a child, he showed an affinity for art, and he briefly attended an art school. At the age of 13, he left school to become an apprentice to a stained glass maker. During his teen years, his fascination for the occult grew apace, heavily influencing the work he produced. In May 1904 EV, one of his drawings was exhibited at the annual Royal Academy exhibition in London, generating a storm of publicity for the young artist.

In October 1907 Spare exhibited his drawings at the Bruton gallery in London. His work resembled that of Aubrey Beardsley, but was full of grotesque, sexualized human figures and magical symbols. These elements appealed to avant-garde London intellectuals, and brought him to the attention of Aleister Crowley. Spare became a Probationer of Crowley's order A.'.A.'. in July 1909, but was not initiated as a member, although he contributed four small drawings to Crowley's publication The Equinox. Crowley later characterized Spare as a "Black Brother."

4
(Statue of Dionysus. Marble, 2nd century CE (arms and legs were heavily restored in the 18th century), found in Italy. Richelieu Collection; seized during the French Revolution, 1793. Louvre Museum, Department of Greek, Etruscan and Roman antiquities, Deno)

The Greek god Dionysus (or Dionysos, Iacchus or Iakkhos, Bacchus or Bakkhos, and also identified with the Italic Liber), represented not only the intoxicating power of wine, but also its social and beneficent influences, and the vital energies expressed in the growth of trees and vines. He was viewed as the promoter of civilization, a lawgiver, and lover of peace — as well as the patron deity of both agriculture and the theater.

Among his many titles were Firstborn (Protogonos), Fire-born, Roarer (Bromios), Twy-form (Diphues), Rain Giver, Flowery (Antheus), Fruity (Karpios), Black Footed, Two-Mothered (Bimater), and Torn Asunder (Sparagmos).

5
(Celestial map from the 17th century, by the Dutch cartographer Frederik de Wit. Frederick de Wit (1630–1698))

"I dined at Cosegrave's house one night. He had asked Evangeline Adams to meet me as being a famous astrologer. The meeting led to a lengthy association. She wanted me to write a book on astrology for her. The plan failed through her persistent efforts to cheat me out of the profits, and her obstinate ignorance of the elementary facts of nature combined with an unconquerable antagonism to the principles of applying common sense to the science.

I learned a good deal, nevertheless. The work kept me concentrated on the subject. At this time, it was my invariable practice to judge from the personal appearance of every stranger I met the sign rising at his birth. Having made up my mind, I would ask him to tell me either the hour or the day of his birth. I could then calculate the missing day as thus: Suppose I judge my man to have Libra in the ascendant and he tells me his birthday is October 1st. When the sun is in 5° or 6° Libra, I can tell him he was born at sunrise, within a limit of error of about two hours. Alternatively, should he say, "I was born at midnight", I can give his birthday to within a fortnight or so of Christmas. I tabulated my results over a considerable period and found that I was right in a little over two cases in three. Where I was wrong, I found that either the sign I had chosen for his ascendant was that occupied by his sun, which in some people determines the personal appearance more effectively than the ascendant, or else, in erecting his horoscope I found the rising sign occupied by planets whose nature modified the sign so that it could be mistaken for the one I had picked out."

("The Confessions of Aleister Crowley", Chapter 77)

6
Tarot 01.

When Aleister Crowley became interested in occultism, his first textbook was Waite's Book of Black Magic and Pacts, and he wrote to the author for advice. Waite counseled Crowley to read Eckarthausen's The Cloud upon the Sanctuary, which was instrumental in forming Crowley's ideals regarding occult orders.

Many years later, after Crowley and Waite had been peers in the Golden Dawn, Crowley subjected Waite to numerous scathing reviews in The Equinox, often with the fictitious pretense that Waite was Crowley's "disciple." Crowley even went so far as to publish an obituary for the still-living Waite.

7
Temple of Khonsu

"This year indeed was another annus mirabilis for me. There was an almost continual outpouring of the Holy Spirit through my mind. The spring of poetry shot crystal clear from the hidden furnace of my being into the pure and brilliant air, and fell and fertilized the earth about the sacred hill. A thousand years from now men will still gather round in wonder and worship to gaze upon the gorgeous pageant of flowers that glow upon the glowing grass and to feast upon the ripe fruits that burden the two great trees which tower like pillars for a gateway to my garden --- the tree of the knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life.

Let me first enumerate the comparatively profane achievements of these few months. Firstly, "Across the Gulf". This is a prose story of some twenty thousand words. The theme is my own life in the 26th Dynasty, when I was Ankh-f-n-khonsu and brought about the Aeon of Osiris to replace that of Isis. The story must not be taken as true in the ordinary sense of the word, but as allegorical."

("The Confessions of Aleister Crowley", Chapter 69)