Portal:Encyclopedia Thelemica/TFA/Featured article 1

From Encyclopedia Thelemica
Jump to navigationJump to search
Amun

Amoun was the Hellenicized name of a major Egyptian deity, in the native language Amun, "the hidden one" (alternative spelling "Amon"). He was one of the Ogdoad and was married to Ipet. He was also a Berber god, but there were differences between the Berber Ammon and the Egyptian Ammon. The Greeks honoured the Berber Ammon, and the Phoenicians mixed their god Baal with the Berber Ammon to create the god Baal-Ammon.

The Egyptian Amoun

He was, to begin with, the local deity of Thebes, when it was an unimportant town on the east bank of the river, about the region now occupied by the temple of Karnak. The Eleventh dynasty dynasty sprang from a family in the Hermonthite nome or perhaps at Thebes itself, and adorned the temple of Karnak with statues. Amenemhe, the name of the founder of the Twelfth dynasty, was compounded with that of Amun and was borne by three of his successors. Several Theban kings of the later part of the Middle Kingdom adopted the same name; and when the Theban family of the Seventeenth dynasty drove out the Hyksos, Ammon, as the god of the royal city, was again prominent.

It was not, however, until the rulers of the Eighteenth dynasty carried their victorious arms beyond the Egyptian frontiers in every direction that Ammon began to assume the proportions of a universal god for the Egyptians, eclipsing all their other deities and asserting his power over the gods of all foreign lands. To Ammon the Pharaohs attributed all their successful enterprises, and on his temples they lavished their wealth and captured spoil. (more...)